Annual grape stomp returns this weekend

Pahrump Valley Winery owners Bill and Gretchen Lokken are pleased this weekend’s annual Grape Stomp contest will occur under sunny skies and mild temperatures, unlike last year when rain put a damper on the final day of the event.

Nevada’s undocumented immigrants declined from 2009-2014

Nevada’s undocumented immigrant population dropped from 2009 through 2014, though the proportion of residents without legal status to remain in the U.S. remained highest in the nation, at 7.2 percent of the total state population, the Pew Research Center reported Tuesday.

Knapp: Crony capitalism and political privilege: Earthshaking, literally

In 1962, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers personnel pumped 165 million gallons of waste fluid into rock 12,000 feet below the surface of the earth at Colorado’s Rocky Mountain Arsenal and noticed that the pumping was accompanied by a number of small earthquakes. Six years later, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored seismic activity as the Corps pumped some of that water back out, observing a noticeable increase in seismic activity after the pumping.

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School bus carrying 32 high school students hit

No injuries were reported after a car collided with a Nye County School District bus at the intersection of Calvada and Pahrump Valley boulevards just before 1 p.m. on Tuesday. The bus was carrying 32 Pahrump Valley High soccer players en route to a game in Las Vegas. The bus sustained minor damage to the crossing arm. The female driver of the car was cited. The crash is the second in two days involving a school bus. Monday’s noninjury incident involved an empty bus on Red Rock Drive.

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Opinion

Myers: Politics borrows product placement

“If I had a bowl of Skittles and I told you just three would kill you, would you still take a handful? That’s our Syrian refugee problem,” Donald Trump Jr. was quoted as writing last week.

Knapp: Crony capitalism and political privilege: Earthshaking, literally

In 1962, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers personnel pumped 165 million gallons of waste fluid into rock 12,000 feet below the surface of the earth at Colorado’s Rocky Mountain Arsenal and noticed that the pumping was accompanied by a number of small earthquakes. Six years later, the U.S. Geological Survey monitored seismic activity as the Corps pumped some of that water back out, observing a noticeable increase in seismic activity after the pumping.

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