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LETTER TO THE EDITOR: High county employee pensions questioned

High county employee pensions questioned

I read with interest your article in Friday, February 21 issue entitled “PERS info made public.”

Most retirees interviewed stated that they ‘ earned’ the high pensions. No, what they EARNED was their weekly paycheck while working. I worked for Xerox Corporation for 18 years and my husband worked for Kodak for 25 years. My pension is $551 per month and his is $1422 per month. How can we afford to retire? For all our working life, we contributed to a 401K account for our own earnings. Why don’t Nye County workers do the same?

These retirees are receiving monthly amounts almost as much or more as they earned while contributing to the work force. I thought the Nye County retirement payments should reflect industry standards. Obviously this is not the case.

When Nye County has budget problems, maybe they should teach their employees to contribute to their OWN retirement, and not offer the Golden Parachute.

Kathryn Erbe

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