87°F
weather icon Clear

Nevada Legislature sends CARE Act to governor

CARSON CITY — The Nevada Assembly give final legislative approval Thursday to a measure designed to help those who provide care to friends and loved ones after they are released from the hospital.

Senate Bill 177, known as the CARE Act, would allow a patient or guardian to designate a caregiver upon admission to a hospital.

It would require the hospital to keep that caregiver informed when a patient is being discharged or moved to another facility. It also would ask hospitals to provide instruction for care needed at home and offer resources when questions arise.

The bill passed unanimously in both the Senate and Assembly and now goes to Gov. Brian Sandoval for his signature.

Supporters confident that Sandoval will sign the bill, which received no opposition at legislative hearings. The governor rarely indicates his support for bills until they reach his desk.

In testimony before health and human services committees, supporters said that too often at-home caregivers are left out of the loop when patients are discharged. Elderly patients can get confused over how to take medications, or caregivers are not provided training on such things as how to assist patients who are in wheelchairs to change bandages.

In written testimony, Dr. Lisa Rosenberg, geriatrics director at Roseman University of Health Sciences in Las Vegas, said an at-home caregiver’s level of preparation often is all that stands between an older adult getting to stay home or returning to the hospital.

“On several levels, this much-needed legislation is a good investment in caring for older frail adults and their caregivers, reducing hospital readmissions and associated costs, reducing morbidity, and saving lives,” Rosenberg said.

AARP, a prime backer of the bill, estimated more than 500,000 family caregivers in Nevada provide services worth $4 billion.

The organization said a recent survey of Nevadans age 45 and older found 70 percent of caregivers performed medical and nursing tasks — from giving medications and administering intravenous fluids to dressing wounds and operating specialized equipment.

Barry Gold, with AARP Nevada, said provisions in the bill “will help caregivers provide better care and in the process may help avoid a return trip to the hospital or worse.”

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Serenity Health’s vaccine effort underway in Pahrump

Monday, May 3 was a big day for the owner and staff at Serenity Mental Health. After weeks of painstaking preparation, the health care company has now officially branched out into COVID-19 vaccine administration.

Pahrump Music Festival still accepting vendors, talent

Lovers of music, art and creativity, those who revel in community gatherings, excitement and activity, mark the calendar for the first weekend in June because organizers of the Pahrump Music Festival are promising four days of fun that are sure to delight the ears, eyes and even the tastebuds.

Brush fires continue to challenge fire crews

As daytime temperatures continue to climb as summer approaches, Pahrump Valley Fire and Rescue Services Chief Scott Lewis recently spoke about the conditions which present numerous challenges for area firefighters.

Pahrump Senior Center reopens

There was a very odd occurrence at the Pahrump Senior Center on Monday, May 3.

Local woman accused of stalking

A Pahrump woman was taken into custody following an extensive stalking investigation.

 
Sales tax holiday proposed for guard members

Gov. Steve Sisolak on Wednesday touted the efforts undertaken during to the COVID-19 crisis to mitigate its economic impacts on Nevada.

Beatty VFW honors VSO Brandi Matheny

Brandi Matheny, of Pahrump, was recognized with a special award by the Veterans of Foreign Wars John Strozzi Post 12108 at their May 12 meeting.

JIM WANG: Let’s get vaccinated: Why vaccination will protect you and the community

From state-wide lockdowns to mandatory health and safety measures, the COVID-19 pandemic changed the way we work, live and play, and unfortunately, has resulted in severe illness and death for many. Since January of 2020, there have been about 32 million reported cases of COVID-19 and about 570,000 total deaths from the virus in the United States. Specific populations of people are at higher risk of getting severely ill or dying from the virus. Among these are adults 65 or older, people with underlying health conditions and people with disabilities. In addition, people in vulnerable populations and some racial and ethnic minority groups are disproportionately affected by COVID-19.