59°F
weather icon Clear

THOMAS KNAPP: Afghanistan Bounties: Pot, Meet Kettle (and Turn Off the Stove!)

“These are anarchists, these are not protesters,” President Donald Trump said on July 20th, defending his decision to unleash Department of Homeland Security hooligans on anti-police-violence demonstrators in Portland. Anarchist-bashing — referring to “radical-left anarchists” in Minneapolis, “ugly anarchists” in Seattle, etc. — has become a consistent Trump campaign theme since May.

Does Trump have any idea what an anarchist is? Or is he just hoping that frequent repetition of a word he associates with widespread fear and loathing will get an increasingly hostile American public back on his side?

It’s somewhat amusing that Donald Trump considers the word “anarchist” an insult, or that he fancies himself morally fit to insult anarchists.

He’s got a lot of nerve, that guy. He’s a head of state. Or, in more accurate English, a second-rate mafia don, chieftain of an overgrown street gang with delusions of grandeur.

Trump and his type — the “leaders” of political governments — murdered hundreds of millions of innocent victims in the 20th century and are already off to a bang-up start in the 21st.

Trump and his ilk steal more wealth, destroy more property, and kill more of the people they claim to serve in any given week than all the anarchists in history combined. Then they try to shift the blame onto their victims and onto the anarchists who stand up for those victims.

Gangsters like Trump (and his 44 predecessors) aren’t morally qualified to shine a Black Bloc rabble-rouser’s Doc Martens, let alone criticize the ideological anarchists who daily expose the protection racket called the state.

Anarchism comes in many flavors, but at root it’s a simple concept: It calls for the absence of rulers.

Note that second “r.” Not an absence of rules, but of charlatans who empower and enrich themselves and their cronies on the false claim that they serve society by enforcing rules.

Nineteenth century anarchist Lysander Spooner exposed the American version of that racket, incidentally prophesying the arrival of Trump:

“[W]hether the Constitution really be one thing, or another, this much is certain — that it has either authorized such a government as we have had, or has been powerless to prevent it. In either case, it is unfit to exist.”

Not all who hear themselves called “anarchists” resemble the remark or deserve the praise, but high praise it is indeed. Anarchists are defenders of freedom and opponents of the death cult known as the modern state.

Thomas L. Knapp (Twitter: @thomaslknapp) is director and senior news analyst at the William Lloyd Garrison Center for Libertarian Advocacy Journalism (thegarrisoncenter.org). He lives and works in north-central Florida.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Letters to the Editor

Many double standards prevail in political circles

TIM BURKE: First Amendment rights in danger on major social media platforms

Freedom of expression is one of our most cherished rights. Over the weekend, the conservative social media platform, Parler, headquartered in Henderson, Nevada, was shut down when Amazon turned off the web services that hosted the platform.

DAN SCHINHOFEN: Open Letter to Nevada House Delegation

To the honorable Representatives of our State. I am taking a moment to write and plead with you to act in the best interest of America rather than your political party. I heard Speaker Pelosi say, on 60 minutes, that one reason to impeach President Trump was so that he could never run again. While your Party has been talking about election interference since 2016 and spent 40 million dollars of our money to investigate “Russian Collusion”, no collusion was found.

Letters to the Editor

Resident disputes timing of trash disposal rate increase

DEBRA J. SAUNDERS: How to start a civil war

President Donald Trump’s supporters didn’t think through what would have happened if they’d succeeded in overturning the legitimate 2020 election.

VICTOR JOECKS: Vaccinate seniors before prisoners

Gov. Steve Sisolak shouldn’t vaccinate felons before senior citizens. Even a casual look at the coronavirus death numbers makes this obvious.

Letters to the Editor

Reader states mural not good use of taxpayer money

DAN SCHINHOFEN: How fragile it all is

If we have not agreed on or learned anything this past year, we should all agree that our freedoms are very fragile. Look at how quickly we conceded our God-given rights to freely exercise our religion, or our right to own property, as in owning a small business. With just a few words from our elected governor, and a declaration here and a directive there we were told it was not safe for us to sing in church. We were directed to close down our business that we spent money, and years of sweat building up to support our families, because we were not deemed “essential”.