92°F
weather icon Clear

Dog shot on highway near Nye County

A dog known as Dudley was found shot in the face on a Nevada highway.

How did he end up there last weekend?

That’s what the Nevada Highway Patrol needs help from the public to figure out.

“Animal cruelty is a felony in Nevada, and these perpetrators need to be brought to justice,” Trooper Jason Buratczuk said in a news release Tuesday.

The dog was found bleeding from his mouth around noon Sunday on U.S. Highway 95 near Paiute Drive, northwest of Las Vegas, according to the Highway Patrol.

Dudley was taken to The Animal Foundation, at 655 N. Mojave Road, where vets determined he had likely been shot in the face.

Dr. Ken Sieranski, a veterinarian with The Animal Foundation, said Dudley was scheduled to have surgery Wednesday to remove bullet fragments and to adjust fractured teeth.

Buratczuk told reporters Tuesday afternoon that two people found the dog on the side of the road near the Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort. They gave Dudley a blanket and a bowl of water, which was already stained red with blood when a trooper arrived.

“It’s unthinkable that someone would do something like this to an animal,” Buratczuk said.

Troopers have no leads on how the dog was shot or how long he was on the side of the road, he said.

“We don’t know who the owner of this dog is,” Buratczuk said. “If (Dudley) was shot, this is a crime.”

Read more about this story, and Dudley, on our newspaper’s website, pvtimes.com

Dudley, whom the Highway Patrol described on Tuesday as “the sweetest dog,” will be up for adoption once he recovers from his injuries. Dudley “loved all the attention and rubs he was getting,” the Highway Patrol said in Tuesday’s release.

“The dog was completely calm, docile, a sweetheart in (the trooper’s) words,” Buratczuk said, adding that it appeared obvious that Dudley was someone’s pet.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
 
Thousands of Nevadans face eviction after federal ban ends this week

A federal protection for tenants who have been unable to pay their rent during the pandemic is expected to expire this week, and thousands of Nevadans are at risk of being evicted from their home.

Poll shows Nevadans support trading caucus for primary

A new poll of Nevada voters released Monday found bipartisan support for getting rid of the caucus system in favor of presidential preference primary elections.

Lake Powell drops to lowest level in reservoir’s history

“This is a benchmark moment,” Kyle Roerink, executive director of the Great Basin Water Network, said Sunday. “And it’s not going to be the last one this summer.”

 
Buffalo Soldiers Day in Nevada celebrated for 3rd year

Nevada’s third Buffalo Soldiers Day was celebrated Saturday to honor the country’s all-Black military units.

Face mask backers urge Board of Regents to make them mandatory for all

Proponents of face masks on college campuses this fall on Friday urged the Nevada Board of Regents to go beyond a mandate for employees OK’d by the Clark County Commission.

Adam Sullivan confirmed as Nevada State Engineer

After serving as “acting” Nevada state engineer and administrator of the Nevada Division of Water Resources (NDWR) for the past seven months, Adam Sullivan has now been confirmed in those positions, with his official appointment reported in a press release issued Tuesday, July 20.

Pahrump Back to School Fair set for July 31

It is once again that time of year when parents and students must turn their thoughts to the coming school term and begin preparing for another nine months of academic endeavors. With the 2021-2022 school year set to begin on Tuesday, August 10 in Nye County, in an effort to help ensure that area families are ready to send their children back to the classroom, be it virtual or in person, the NyE Communities Coalition is now gearing up for its annual Back to School Fair.

Nye County opposing NASA land proposal

In Nevada, mining is a major industry, bringing in millions of dollars in taxes every year and employing thousands of workers in high-paying positions that help support the local economy but much of the mining operations in the Silver State rely on access to federally controlled lands.