50°F
weather icon Mostly Cloudy

BLM comments on Calvada Eye horse removal

Additional information has emerged regarding the relocation of at least three wild horses who graze the Calvada Eye.

Though they are a source of amusement and delight to many local residents who drive by the area, Bureau of Land Management officials (BLM) consider them not just a nuisance, but also potentially dangerous to people and pets, according to BLM Field Staff Ranger Ryan Gallagher.

“We did do an emergency gather here at the Calvada Eye, and there were in particular three horses that have been here pretty much exclusively for several weeks now,” he said. “One of the biggest concerns was a stallion paint horse that was hit by a car about two weeks ago, and we noticed him starting to limp so we needed to take a good look at him.”

Aggressive behavior

Another horse that was relocated was also a mare, who was pregnant and close to giving birth to her foal, which was a serious concern for Gallagher and other BLM officials.

“We noticed the stallion acting aggressively toward her in the last week,” he said. “Generally speaking, wild horses are not the most, shall we say, compassionate family groups. If a foal is not that stallion’s foal, and he’s intent on breeding a mare, he will kill the foal in order to get the mare to go into season again. We’ve also learned that particular stud horse has been involved in two persons getting injured after getting kicked, in addition to the car collision he was in. I actually watched him chase the mare and almost run over some folks walking their dogs here who had nothing to do with the horses.”

No free lunch

Conversely, Gallagher said that the actions of individuals can pose grave consequences for the horses.

He spoke about the importance of not feeding the wild horses.

“They can get hurt feeding, and not feeding the horses, because they are getting accustomed to being fed,” he noted. “It does attract the horses and they do cross the highway here, and it actually is incredibly harmful for the horses.”

Aside from the chance of getting struck by a vehicle while crossing the highway, Gallagher said there are some foods that should never be fed to horses.

“Some of the items that the horses are being fed, and they way they are being fed is very harmful,” he said. “Whole apples and whole carrots are hard food objects that a horse can choke on, and choking is a serious consideration with horses because a horse does not have the ability to cough or regurgitate, so if they get a hard object of food stuck in their throat, they’re going to die. Most veterinarians will euthanize a domestic horse if that happens. I’ve had to do that with a personally owned domestic horse and it’s an ugly day.”

Law enforcement warning

As a way to dissuade people from feeding the horses, Gallagher said individuals can and have been cited.

“Folks can certainly be cited for it,” he warned. “It’s both a violation of federal law, and there’s a Nevada state law that prohibits the feeding of feral livestock as well. Feeding a horse that’s not yours, be it a wild horse, a stray horse, or somebody else’s horse in their yard is just not polite and not smart because a lot of horses are on managed diets, and it can really really harm them.”

Additionally, Gallagher said the three wild horses will most likely be put up for adoption at a facility in Ridgecrest, California once they’ve been medically examined.

For additional information on possibly adopting a wild horse or burro, visit www.blm.gov/programs/wild-horse-and-burro/adoptions-and-sales.

Contact reporter Selwyn Harris at sharris@pvtimes.com. On Twitter: @pvtimes

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Nevada police agencies to receive grant monies

At least $1.4 million in a Community Policing Development (CPD) program will make its way to Nevada to help support law enforcement officers.

VICTOR JOECKS: How Joe Biden stole Christmas

Christmas classics would be a lot different if they had been written during President Joe Biden’s administration.

Motorcycle crash prompts Mercy Air response

A structure fire on the 4400 block of East Paiute Boulevard prompted the response of Pahrump Valley Fire and Rescue Services crews.

Mizpah rates high in list of haunted stops

Under an agreement between conservationists and a federal agency, a finding must be issued by the end of the month.

 
Sisolak prepares for ‘heated year’ ahead of 2022 election

Gov. Steve Sisolak, in an interview at the governor’s mansion in Carson City, said he prays daily for guidance in handling the COVID pandemic.

Beatty VFW Memory Garden Dedicated

The Beatty VFW Memory Garden is now open and was dedicated Oct. 9 during the VFW post’s Fall Festival, which featured food, art and craft booths, and a silent auction.

Airport signs to soon show ‘Harry Reid’ as new name

Work could commence soon on updating signage at McCarran International Airport to reflect the name change to Harry Reid International Airport.

Ground turkey products recalled

Butterball, LLC, a Mount Olive, N.C. establishment, is recalling approximately 14,107 pounds of ground turkey products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically blue plastic, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS).

Nevada Highway Patrol receives $100k public safety grant

By putting in additional efforts to combat drunk and distracted drivers along Silver State roadways, the Nevada Department of Public Safety, Highway Patrol Division has received a grant in the amount of $100,000 from the Nevada Department of Public Safety, Office of Traffic Safety for targeted DUI enforcement campaigns during the coming year.