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Seasonal fire restrictions take effect on Nevada public lands

Seasonal fire restrictions went into effect early this month across Southern Nevada to prevent wildfires on public land.

The restrictions, expected to remain in place until this fall, apply to all areas controlled by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, the Bureau of Reclamation, Mount Charleston’s fire prevention district, the National Park Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Forest Service.

With a few, site-specific exceptions, the restrictions prohibit building or using a campfire or charcoal stove, welding or operating an acetylene torch with open flames, using any explosive unless permitted, using fireworks or firing tracer bullets and operating an off-road vehicle without a spark arrestor.

Agency-specific restrictions also announced:

■ BLM: Steel core ammunition and explosive targets are prohibited. Smoking is allowed only in an enclosed vehicle.

■ Lake Mead National Recreation Area: Wood or charcoal fires are allowed in grills in picnic areas and campgrounds; wood or charcoal-burning devices are allowed on the shoreline at least 100 feet from any natural vegetation; barbecue grills are allowed on private boats outside the harbors of Lake Mead and Lake Mohave; rental boats are authorized to use barbecues attached to the vessel if permitted under the rental boat agreement; all vessel barbecue fires must be at least 100 feet away from shoreline vegetation.

Smoking is allowed outside of an enclosed vehicle in areas that are cleared of all flammable material for at least three feet, and cigarettes must be discarded in an ashtray in a developed area.

■ Tule Springs Fossil Beds National Monument: Fires are never permitted within the monument.

■ U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service: campfires are allowed in fire rings at Desert Pass Campground on Desert National Wildlife Refuge. Grills at Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge may be used.

■ U.S. Forest Service: Campfires are allowed within the approved fire pits or grills. Smoking is allowed in areas at least three feet in diameter that is clear of all flammable materials.

Anyone who needs clarification on the restrictions is urged to contact the U.S. Forest Service at 702-872-5486, U.S. Fire and Wildlife Service at 702-525-5450, the National Park Service at 702-293-8990 or BLM at 702-515-5000.

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