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Details set for Fall Festival in Pahrump community

Updated September 6, 2018 - 3:12 pm

Editor’s note: A story in the Sept. 5 Pahrump Valley Times contained incorrect information on the Pahrump Fall Festival. This story corrects the information and expands on the previous version.

The gates will soon open to an annual celebration that typically brings out hundreds of locals and those traveling through town.

The 54th Annual Pahrump Fall Festival, a four-day event, is set to launch at 4 p.m. on Sept. 27 at Petrack Park at 150 N. Nevada Highway 160.

Festivalgoers will be able to enjoy midway games, carnival rides and food and craft vendors. The event, dubbed “Modern Country with Attitude” for 2018, will also feature bull riding, mega trucks, motocross, live entertainment and other fun.

A parade is also planned to start at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 29 and begins at Highway 160 and Oxbow Avenue. Highway 160 shuts down at 8 a.m. that day for the parade that travels about two miles down the highway south to Dandelion Street.

Admission is free to the event, but for those interested in carnival rides, bands for unlimited rides can be purchased online at pahrumptickets.com for $25 for one daily pass through Sept. 25, according to information on the online portal. The cost is $30 at the gate.

On day one of the festival (Sept. 27), festivalgoers who want to enjoy freestyle motocross events can also purchase those at pahrumptickets.com for $10 or at the gate on the day of the event. The event will be held at the McCullough Memorial Rodeo Arena; doors open at 6 p.m. and the event is set to get underway at 7 p.m.

The action picks up on Friday and Saturday (Sept. 28-29) at the arena with mega trucks, freestyle motocross and bulls.

Tickets for the event can be purchased online through Sept. 25 at a cost of $20 for one adult each night, a total of $40 for both nights, and $10 for kids ages three to 13 for each day, $20 for both nights per entrant. Kids younger than three are free on both nights.

If tickets are purchased at the gate, it goes up to $25 for adults and $15 for kids ages three to 13.

Tickets can also be purchased at Valley Electric Association at 800 E. Highway 372, Shadow Mountain Feed at 2031 W. Bell Vista Ave. and the Pahrump Valley Chamber of Commerce at 1301 S. Highway 160 on the second floor of the Nevada State Bank building.

The main event starts at 7 p.m. and a pit party begins at 5:30 p.m. at the arena on each night of Sept. 28-29.

On Sunday (Sept. 30), the arena will have a team roping competition and barrel racing competition starting at 8 a.m., the Pahrump Valley Chamber of Commerce reports. There is no cost to attend and event times vary throughout the day.

Other festivities include a tuff truck and off-highway vehicle competition. The event will be held at the arena at 11 a.m. on Sept. 29.

Admission is free to spectators and the cost to compete is $30 with signups starting at 10 a.m. The payout is the pot plus $100, according to details on the Pahrump Valley Chamber of Commerce’s Facebook page.

According to a schedule from the Pahrump Valley Chamber of Commerce, the festival will open at 11 a.m. and shut at 4 p.m. on Sept. 30, the last day of the event. Vendor hours stay consistent with those times but ending times may vary for carnival rides.

Vendor hours on the first day of festivities start at 4 p.m. and end at 10 p.m. The next two nights, Sept. 28-29, run from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. with varying ending times for carnival rides, which can depend on demand for ridership.

Festivalgoers can find information on events at pahrumpchamber.com/fall-festival

The Pahrump Valley Chamber of Commerce is the organizer of the event.

Contact reporter Jeffrey Meehan at jmeehan@pvtimes.com.

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