48°F
weather icon Clear

CDC doesn’t follow suit with FDA on Pfizer booster shots

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration amended its emergency use authorization for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to allow for booster shots for certain populations.

Individuals age 65 and older will now be able to obtain a Pfizer booster shot six months after the initial series. Also, people age 18 to 64 that are at high risk of severe COVID-19 infections and those in that age category that have “frequent institutional or occupational exposure to the virus,” where they are put at high risk of serious complications of COVID-19 or severe COVID, will also be able to get the booster shot.

“Today’s action demonstrates that science and the currently available data continues to guide the FDA’s decision-making for COVID-19 vaccines during this pandemic,” said Acting FDA Commissioner Janet Woodcock, M.D. in a Wednesday release. “After considering the totality of the available scientific evidence and the deliberations of our advisory committee of independent, external experts, the FDA amended the EUA for the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to allow for a booster dose in certain populations such as health care workers, teachers and day care staff, grocery workers and those in homeless shelters or prisons, among others.”

Woodcock added, “This pandemic is dynamic and evolving, with new data about vaccine safety and effectiveness becoming available every day. As we learn more about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines, including the use of a booster dose, we will continue to evaluate the rapidly changing science and keep the public informed.”

The Center for Disease Control’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices was expected to make the recommendation for the Pfizer booster shot on Thursday. The committee did move forward on Thursday, though it stopped short in recommending third shots for frontline health care workers and people exposed at their job. The CDC recommended that the booster be administered six months after the initial series of the COVID-19 Pfizer vaccine. s

Most state health departments typically follow suit with the recommendations of the CDC.

The CDC recommended in mid-August that a third shot be made available for people who are severely immunocompromised.

The Biden administration announced earlier in the week that people who already had received two shots over eight months ago should be able to get a booster. But the FDA took a narrower approach.

The FDA reported that the most commonly reported side effects by clinical trial participants that received a booster shot of the Pfizer vaccine were pain, redness and swelling at the injection site and fatigue, according to the FDA’s release. Other common side effects listed were headache, muscle or joint pain and chills.

“Of note, swollen lymph nodes in the underarm were observed more frequently following the booster dose than after the primary two-dose series,” the FDA said.

The Pfizer vaccine first became available at the end of 2020 for people age 16 and older. That was expanded to include ages 12-15 in May of this year; and in August, the third dose was approved for severely immunocompromised individuals.

Contact Editor Jeffrey Meehan at jmeehan@pvtimes.com

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
Nevada Highway Patrol receives $100k public safety grant

By putting in additional efforts to combat drunk and distracted drivers along Silver State roadways, the Nevada Department of Public Safety, Highway Patrol Division has received a grant in the amount of $100,000 from the Nevada Department of Public Safety, Office of Traffic Safety for targeted DUI enforcement campaigns during the coming year.

Fire restrictions lifted at Humboldt-Toiyabe

The ban and other restrictions, which previously applied only to federal lands such as the Humbldt-Toiyabe National Forest, have been expanded to all public lands in Nevada.

FDA pushes for reduction in salt in packaged foods, restaurants

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration released guidance on Wednesday in an effort to reduce the amount of salt in food products at restaurants, school cafeterias and packaged and prepared foods. Food makers, however, are not obligated to take action in the voluntary guidance.

Social Security benefits to rise 5.9% in 2022

The Social Security Administration announced a cost-of-living raise of 5.9% starting in 2022, the largest annual increase in 40 years. The rise, however, comes in the face of other increases in food, shelter and other goods.

Solar project discussion riles Pahrump citizens

The Pahrump Public Lands Advisory Committee had what may very well have been the biggest turnout the advisory body has ever seen before during its Tuesday, Oct. 12 meeting.

Pumpkin Days returns to Pahrump next weekend

Fall is in the air and for the town of Pahrump, that means it’s almost time for Pumpkin Days.

Adam Laxalt stumps in Pahrump

U.S. Senate candidate Adam Laxalt made a stop in the valley last week, spending some time at local eatery Mom’s Diner to speak with area residents as he ramps up his campaign for the 2022 election.

Pahrump local’s Kids Costume Car Wash a success

Pahrump resident Shauna “Shay” Dragna and her three youngsters, Cayleigh, Caden and Conner, have spent the last month focusing on their very first public philanthropy project and though they entered into the endeavor without any previous experience and absolutely no idea how it might turn out, the results of their efforts are bearing some very positive fruit.

 
Cegavske won’t allow tax petitions off 2022 ballot

Nevada Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske has told Attorney General Aaron Ford in a letter the state constitution doesn’t allow for petitions to be withdrawn.