62°F
weather icon Windy

Nevada Senate OKs medically assisted suicide

CARSON CITY — Physician-assisted suicide is a step closer to being legal in Nevada after senators voted on a razor-thin margin to pass a resolution Wednesday.

Lawmakers voted 11-10 to advance Senate Bill 239, with all Republicans voting against the measure, with Democratic state Sens. Dina Neal, D-North Las Vegas, and James Ohrenschall, D-Las Vegas.

If approved by the Assembly and signed by Gov. Joe Lombardo, the bill would allow terminally ill patients over the age of 18 with less than six months to live to end their lives with lethal drugs prescribed by a medical practitioner.

Senators also voted 15-6 to pass Senate Bill 131, a bill that would bar state agencies from providing resources or information to help out-of-state authorities from prosecuting individuals who receive an abortion in Nevada.

Senate Democrats, joined by Senate Minority Leader Heidi Seevers Gansert, R-Reno, and Sen. Carrie Buck, R-Henderson, voted to approve the measure. If passed, the bill would codify an executive order issued by former Gov. Steve Sisolak days after the U.S. Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade.

“When I look at this legislation, the current executive order and given the hodgepodge of laws across the U.S., the one thing that jumps off the page to me is women who face these difficult choices, we need to give them our support and our prayers, but we don’t need to give them jail time,” Seevers Gansert said.

The vote comes two days after the Senate voted to advance a resolution seeking to guarantee abortion rights through an amendment to the state Constitution. Senators voted on party lines to send Senate Joint Resolution 7 to the Assembly on Monday.

Senators also approved a bill that would allow health care providers to prescribe, dispense or administer contraceptive drugs or devices to minors without consent from the minor’s parent or guardian.

Senate Bill 172 passed on a vote of 14-7, with Seevers Gansert as the only Republican voting in support. Her colleague, Republican Sen. Ira Hansen, R-Sparks, strongly opposed the measure.

“People in our public schools can’t give a pupil an aspirin, but here we’re going to have people going behind their parents’ backs and getting medications that could have substantial health risks to that child,” Hansen said. “Do we really want to remove parents from this decision-making process?”

But Sen. Dallas Harris, D-Las Vegas, the bill’s primary sponsor pushed back during her closing remarks on the floor.

“It makes zero sense to allow a minor to get treated for something but not allow them to try and get prevention on the front end,” Harris said.

State senators also voted 13-8 on party lines to approve Senate Bill 215, which would require any local government that accepted state money to buy voting machines to return those funds if the jurisdiction decides to not use them and instead conduct an election only by paper ballot.

Lawmakers also voted 18-3 to advance a measure requiring Clark and Washoe counties to include a “heat mitigation element” in their master development plans. Sens. Hansen, Robin Titus, R-Wellington, and Scott Hammond, R-Las Vegas, voted against that bill.

Senators also voted unanimously to approve a bill that would allow individuals experiencing homelessness to be able to use a service provider’s address as their temporary mailing address.

Contact Taylor R. Avery at TAvery@reviewjournal.com. Follow @travery98 on Twitter.

Don't miss the big stories. Like us on Facebook.
THE LATEST
A heartwarming Winter Bed Build

The Nye County Chapter of Sleep in Heavenly Peace hosted its very first Winter Community Bed Build last month and group members were not disappointed by the results.

GridLiance proposes transmission line upgrades

GridLiance is planning some major upgrades for its local transmission system and while these could certainly help support solar expansion, company officials stressed that the two proposed projects are in no way dependent upon such development.

NCSO: Two-vehicle collision claims life of Pahrump child

A Pahrump family is mourning the death of a child killed in a two-vehicle collision early Friday evening, Feb. 23. The crash occurred at the intersection of Highway 160 and Homestead Road just after 8 p.m.

Valley aquifer could reach “critical management” levels by 2055

After many months of painstaking research and calculations, a date has been placed on when the Pahrump Valley’s sole-source aquifer could reach critical management, with officials pegging the timeline at somewhere between the year 2055 and 2060. However, it was emphasized that this is an estimation and with so many variables at play, there is a possibility it could change.

How an injured and abandoned dog in Pahrump overcame the odds

A stray dog that was homeless, hospitalized and facing euthanasia earlier this month is now on the mend thanks to several in the community who helped raise thousands for its life-saving care.

Kellogg Park set for $70k expansion — here are the plans

The town of Pahrump is poised to purchase a parcel adjoining the lands dedicated to Kellogg Park, with a $70,000 offer for the 4.39 acre lot at 3781 E. Santovito St.

Guns, drugs, cash recovered in search could be part of crime ring, sheriff says

Officials from the U.S. Homeland Security Investigations Unit are assisting the Nye County Sheriff’s Office in the arrest and investigation of a man allegedly found possessing a hoard of guns, drugs and cash, according to Sheriff Joe McGill.

No same-day registration for Nye’s next live tax sale

Nye County is coming up on its next delinquent property tax sale and there is going to be a big change to the process — for the first time, there will be no same-day registration available.